KBT funds staff training at the African Braille Center

Thanks to funding from the Kilimanjaro Blind Trust, the African Braille Centre has been able to train staff at area schools to undertake minor Brailler maintenance and repairs.

“Children in school will not have to go for days without accessing their Brailler due to minor defects. The blind children will be able to learn side by side with their sighted peers and using a ‘pen’ that is equally reliable,” said ABC Production/ Development Manager Kiprotich Juma.

Kiprotich explained that when children who are blind take examinations, it is impossible to share Braillers. He further reckons that, what blind children need is to be given equal opportunity so they may perform well in class and during examination.

Kiprotich explained that when children who are blind take examinations, it is impossible to share Braillers and this can make it harder for teachers to keep up with curriculum goals.

“Education is the key to a better future life and this will not be possible without braille literacy for a blind person,” Kiprotich said.

Braille literacy, Kiprotich said, permits greater independence for children who are blind when they go on to college and careers. For instance by knowing braille, individuals who are blind can give presentations or speeches without memorizing the content, and they can take notes for future reference.

By supporting braille instruction programs and providing Perkins Braillers® to those in need, Perkins, the Kiliminjaro Blind Trust, and the African Braille Centre are creating new possibilities for children who are blind in East Africa.